Merging Multiple SimpleCov Coverage Results

As part of our Roadmap service at FastRuby.io, we have to analyze the test suite of the application we are upgrading to give a proper estimate on how long it will take us to upgrade. We use SimpleCov for this.

Most of our clients use parallelization in their continuous integration tools. SimpleCov generates multiple .resultset.json files for the same codebase. Our goal was to have a single result for the whole application, so in this blog post we are going to show you how we solved that problem.

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Introducing Skunk: Combine Code Quality and Coverage to Calculate a Stink Score

Two weeks ago I had the opportunity to speak at Solidus Conf 2019. I presented Escaping the Tar Pit for the first time and I got to talk about a few metrics that we can use to quickly assess code quality in any Ruby project.

In this article I'd like to talk about Skunk: A Stink Score Calculator! I'll explain why we need it, how it works, and the roadmap for this new tool.

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RubyCritic v4.2.0: Now with SimpleCov Support

Every time we evaluate a new project we follow a well-defined process to decide whether we take it or not. We analyze its dependencies; its code coverage; and its code quality to determine the amount of tech debt in a project. We have been using CodeClimate to assess code quality and SimpleCov to assess code coverage.

In my previous article I wrote about free and open source Ruby gems we can use to assess code quality for any Ruby or Rails project. After writing that article, I found that RubyCritic was really interesting and its community quite active, so I thought it was a good idea to add SimpleCov support to it: https://github.com/whitesmith/rubycritic/pull/319

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Three Awesome Libraries to Assess Code Quality in Ruby

As part of our Rails upgrade business we get to evaluate a lot of codebases every month. We usually need a quick way to assess the quality of the code we get. For this we like to use CodeClimate and SimpleCov.

CodeClimate is free for open source projects and paid for private projects. I know that not everybody can pay for their service, so I thought it was a good idea to share some free, open source alternatives.

Here is a list of 3 tools that can help you assess the quality of your next codebase.

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How to Upgrade Any Rails Application Using Docker

Every time we start a new Rails upgrade project, we need to setup a whole new environment in our local machines. Sometimes that leads us down the rabbit hole which ends up breaking our environment for other client projects.

After years upgrading Rails applications, we learned that the best way to isolate our client projects' environments is using Docker.

That's why we decided to use Docker and docker-compose for all of our client projects. This year I had the opportunity to share our process in a series of workshops: Upgrade Rails 101: The Roadmap to Smooth Upgrades

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