Articles about Upgrades

Merging Multiple SimpleCov Coverage Results

As part of our Roadmap service at FastRuby.io, we have to analyze the test suite of the application we are upgrading to give a proper estimate on how long it will take us to upgrade. We use SimpleCov for this.

Most of our clients use parallelization in their continuous integration tools. SimpleCov generates multiple .resultset.json files for the same codebase. Our goal was to have a single result for the whole application, so in this blog post we are going to show you how we solved that problem.

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How to Upgrade Any Rails Application Using Docker

Every time we start a new Rails upgrade project, we need to setup a whole new environment in our local machines. Sometimes that leads us down the rabbit hole which ends up breaking our environment for other client projects.

After years upgrading Rails applications, we learned that the best way to isolate our client projects' environments is using Docker.

That's why we decided to use Docker and docker-compose for all of our client projects. This year I had the opportunity to share our process in a series of workshops: Upgrade Rails 101: The Roadmap to Smooth Upgrades

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Cleaning up: ActiveRecord::Dirty 5.2 API Changes

With the release of Rails 5.2 just around the corner (Rails 5.2 RC1 is already available!), we will be taking a look at some of the upcoming changes to the ActiveRecord::Dirty module. If you're running Rails 5.1, you may have already seen some of the deprecation warnings related to the API changes contained in it. Most of them are behavior changes, and there are some new additions as well.

To better understand these modifications, we'll take a look at sample projects in Rails 5.1 and Rails 5.2.

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Upgrade Rails from 3.2 to 4.0

This article is part of our Upgrade Rails series. To see more of them, click here.

A previous post covered some general tips to take into account for this migration. This article will try to go a bit more in depth. We will first go from 3.2 to 4.0, then to 4.1 and finally to 4.2. Depending on the complexity of your app, a Rails upgrade can take anywhere from one week for a single developer, to a few months for two developers.

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