Articles by Ernesto Tagwerker

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Introducing Skunk: Combine Code Quality and Coverage to Calculate a Stink Score

Two weeks ago I had the opportunity to speak at Solidus Conf 2019. I presented Escaping the Tar Pit for the first time and I got to talk about a few metrics that we can use to quickly assess code quality in any Ruby project.

In this article I'd like to talk about Skunk: A Stink Score Calculator! I'll explain why we need it, how it works, and the roadmap for this new tool.

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RubyCritic v4.2.0: Now with SimpleCov Support

Every time we evaluate a new project we follow a well-defined process to decide whether we take it or not. We analyze its dependencies; its code coverage; and its code quality to determine the amount of tech debt in a project. We have been using CodeClimate to assess code quality and SimpleCov to assess code coverage.

In my previous article I wrote about free and open source Ruby gems we can use to assess code quality for any Ruby or Rails project. After writing that article, I found that RubyCritic was really interesting and its community quite active, so I thought it was a good idea to add SimpleCov support to it: https://github.com/whitesmith/rubycritic/pull/319

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Three Awesome Libraries to Assess Code Quality in Ruby

As part of our Rails upgrade business we get to evaluate a lot of codebases every month. We usually need a quick way to assess the quality of the code we get. For this we like to use CodeClimate and SimpleCov.

CodeClimate is free for open source projects and paid for private projects. I know that not everybody can pay for their service, so I thought it was a good idea to share some free, open source alternatives.

Here is a list of 3 tools that can help you assess the quality of your next codebase.

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How to Upgrade Any Rails Application Using Docker

Every time we start a new Rails upgrade project, we need to setup a whole new environment in our local machines. Sometimes that leads us down the rabbit hole which ends up breaking our environment for other client projects.

After years upgrading Rails applications, we learned that the best way to isolate our client projects' environments is using Docker.

That's why we decided to use Docker and docker-compose for all of our client projects. This year I had the opportunity to share our process in a series of workshops: Upgrade Rails 101: The Roadmap to Smooth Upgrades

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Getting Ready for Rails 6.0: How to Dual Boot

RailsConf 2019 is right around the corner. That means Rails 6.0 is right around the corner! Rails 6.0's beta has been available since January 18, 2019. Rails 6.0.0.rc1 was released today! 🎉

In this article I will explain how you can dual boot your application in your local environment and your CI server. I hope that this will help you get ready for the next stable release of Rails.

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Legacy Rails: Silently Judging You

I had to come up with a clever title because this article is about legacy Rails applications and I know that you might fall asleep by the third paragraph. Boooooring... You probably want to read about that new JavaScript framework that came out (I love that this sentence will always be true, it doesn't matter when you read this)

If you have been working with Rails for a few years, you have seen your fair share of shiny new applications, well-maintained and poorly-maintained legacy applications. This post is about Legacy Rails applications

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Tips for Writing Fast Rails: Part 1

Rails is a powerful framework. You can write a lot of features in a short period of time. In the process you can easily write code that performs poorly.

At Ombu Labs we like to maintain Ruby on Rails applications. In the process of maintaining them, adding features and fixing bugs, we like to improve the code and its performance (because we are good boy scouts!)

Here are some tips based on our experience.

Prefer where instead of select

When you are performing a lot of calculations, you should load as little as possible into memory. Always prefer a SQL query vs. an object's method call.

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